SUCCESS FACTORS
Theme: Human Capital
Organization Level: System
Critical elements: Higher-performing districts/systems cite human capital as a primary success factor and therefore devote considerable time, energy, and resources to attracting and cultivating teachers and instructional leaders who share the college- and career-readiness mission and are willing to work diligently to achieve it.
Practice: Higher performing districts/systems and systems cite human capital as a primary success factor and therefore devote considerable time, energy, and resources to attracting and cultivating teachers and instructional leaders who share the college readiness m

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CriteriaLess Effective PracticesSuccess Factors for Meeting State StandardsSuccess Factors for College and Career Readiness
School Leaders as Instructional Leaders

The primary role of a school leader is to serve as a building manager, and s/he is responsible for a wide array of administrative tasks not directly related to student achievement. School leaders may be hired based on skills other than expertise in instruction and coaching of teachers.

Instructional leadership to promote student achievement is foremost among a school leaders responsibilities and a key consideration in the hiring process.

School leaders chief responsibility is to raise student achievement and fulfill the college and career readiness mission, and they are hired based on past success in improving student learning. To support school leaders in that role, the district/system provides services or staff to assist with operations.

Cultivating Leadership

The district/system does not support a career path for identifying and growing leaders from within. Even the most highly skilled teachers have limited options for acquiring leadership skills or taking on broader instructional responsibilities.

The district/system identifies particularly effective teachers and encourages them to apply to become coaches, APs, or other types of instructional leaders.

The district/system invests considerable resources in cultivating instructional leadership. Effective teachers with leadership potential are identified and supported into varied roles via clear career pathways. Professional development opportunities are available to career teachers to develop their practice as well as to mentor other teachers.

Professional Development

District/system-wide professional development is limited and lacks coherence. New teacher training tends to focus on procedural onboarding and mandated topics. Professional development activities are not based on the mission or goals, student performance data, or observed teacher need.

Professional development provided by the district/system is aligned with the goal of student mastery of standards; activities include a strong instructional component for both new and veteran teachers; topics are informed by student achievement data and teacher performance measures. Professional development is frequent and ongoing.

Professional growth and support for continuous improvement are emphasized for all educators, newly hired teachers and instructional leaders alike. Professional development is collaborative, extensive, ongoing and coherent, and it encompasses all aspects of a long-term college and career readiness mission.







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